The Top 50 Sustainable Clothing Brands For 2020

Another year, another annual guide from Goose Studios to the brands we reckon are flying the flag best for sustainable clothing.


This years list of sustainable brands features everything from a whole load of men's and women's organic cotton casual clothing, to recycled polyester sportswear, to recycled swimwear and everything in between.


This year we've cut out a lot of the stupidly expensive luxury brands, replacing them with more reasonably priced brands, and more fun brands. We want this list to be a great discovery tool for the sustainable clothes that will not only keep you looking fly, but also keep your bank account happy(ish) - all without sacrificing sustainability or ethics.


All images you see are owned by the respective brands. Any issues on that front drop us a line on info@goosestudios.co.uk

Right then, strap yourselves in. Here are our top 50 brands for 2020...


1. Thinking Mu

Thinking Mu are Spanish and have that sort of effortless continental style vibe that makes you fall in love with pretty much every twenty-something señor and señorita you pass by when you visit Barcelona.


They have this style that on the face of it looks super casual. For guys printed tees, tapered cropped trousers and knitted polos, for girls lightweight jumpsuits, tank tops and oversized sweats. But then when you see it all being worn it suddenly feels like you could wear it to some super bougie brunch place and look about 20x cooler than anyone else.


It’s all organic cotton, hemp or recycled synthetics and everything comes in muted shades of warm colour that make you dream of cold cervezas, tapas and being somewhere gloriously hot.


It’s everything England often fails miserably to achieve, all wrapped up in one rather wonderful sustainable clothing brand.


2. Armedangels

Armedangels are the kind of sustainable clothing brand that once you find them, you wonder how doesn’t everyone know them? It’s like looking at what every fast-fashion unsustainable brand should use as a model for how their business should look if their shareholders had even an ounce of concern about the future of the planet.


Armedangels make the everyday clothes you want, in up-to-date contemporary styles without ending up too ‘fashion’, and price everything fairly.


They cover men’s and women’s and are GOTS certified, only using organic cotton, organic linen and organic wool. Add onto that they’re members of the Fair Wear foundation to improve working conditions for garment workers across the world and Fair Trade to improve the lives of farmers at the source of raw-materials. They have a whole load of vegan PETA-approved styles too.


It doesn’t get much cleaner than Armedangels.


For guys you're looking at a staple range of denim, sweatshirts, chinos and tees. While for women it’s a more stylised and broader range of cropped wide leg trousers, killer summer dresses, statement tees and lightweight shirts. Last time we checked they do 6 fits of organic cotton denim too.


Thanks for existing Armedangels. Tell your friends.


3. Nudie Jeans

Nudie jeans are without doubt the coolest of the original sustainable clothing pioneers. Whilst other brands scramble to make bold claims like “all our our denim will come from sustainable sources by 2025”, Nudie jeans have been making all their denim in organic cotton since 2012.


They also led the way with life-time repairs and in-store repair shops in cities across the world. Using these stores as a base for repair, reselling or recycling. In 2018 they made 55,173 repairs FOR FREE. Damn Nudie, I think we’re in love.


If you can’t get to one of their repair shops they partner with a whole load of repair partners where you can get local repairs for free. Or failing that they’ll send you a free repair kit.


Basically everything that any self-respecting premium denim brand does now, they have Nudie jeans to thank for.


We’ll admit, Nudie isn’t that cheap, but if you wear your jeans every single day, and want to keep the same pair for years and years, then they’re a much more accessible price point than most of the premium denim market. The whole ‘free repairs for life’ deal does mean you buy once and stay happy forever too.


We’ve got big love for their slim, but not too slim, fits and they sell a range or organic and fair-trade cotton tees, sweats for men and women. It’s a Northern European, subtly scandi sort of vibe.



Did we mention they’re one of the front runners for paying the living wage to their Indian and Tunisian suppliers?



Yup, we’re definitely in love.


4. Goose Studios

At Goose Studios we make t-shirts that won’t let you down. Seriously durable, super soft and ethically sourced from fair factories. To top it all off we’ve only ever used GOTS organic cotton. 


Our tees are your classic go-to style for easy-going lockdown life. Hopefully some time in the none too distant future they’ll also be your perfect pairing for pub sessions with mates, disco dancing after hours and the first thing to go in the suitcase for a weekend away.


Expect to find classic fit, medium weight plain tees starting at £16. Alongside women's specific utility inspired cuts and printed tees screen printed by hand.


So grab your favourite pair of jeans, dig out your vans, throw on one of our tees and you’ll be pretty much set for anything life can throw at you.


Oh and we average 5 stars out of 5 from our customers. Which is all rather kind of them.


5. Finisterre

Based on the wilds of the Cornish coastline, Finisterre started out life making seriously functional clothing for people who actively sought out to go into the sea to surf in January. They named these folk ’cold water surfers’, whilst everyone else solidly agreed the name for them was ‘crazy’. 


Skip forward a decade and Finisterre makes seriously durable clothing for men and women who like to stay stylish as well as enjoy the great outdoors - no matter what the temperature of the sea.


A B-Corp certified business, Finisterre are pioneers in recycled jackets, supported a flock of British Bowmont Merino sheep to make their jumpers from and were one of the first brands to make swimwear made from recycled fishing nets. Add in a large range of GOTS certified organic cotton styles and Finisterre become your go-to brand if you aspire to an outdoors life but actually live in North London. 


To top it off they offer an in-house repair service run by a fab team, and make a range of accessories from leftover fabric.



For men and women, autumn/winter is the best season to shop from Finisterre. Expect chunky wool fisherman knits, lightweight insulated jackets and thick shirting for guys. While for women it’s worth checking out their coveralls and dungarees, high waisted organic cotton canvas trousers and their insulated jackets.


6. Arvin Goods

Seriously solid socks. Some companies can get distracted by being everything to everyone. Not Arvin.


If you want a seriously durable pair of soft, warm, cushioned socks - that come in the kind of colour ways that are so subtle and so cool that you’ll have your friends slyly asking you where you got your socks from…then go check out Arvin Goods.


They’ve made it onto this list as their socks are made from upcycled cotton and recycled polyester. And currently they’re doing 3 pairs of socks for $30 and they’ll donate $5 of that to charity. Nice one.


Actually thinking about it, probably the best way to describe if you’ll be into Arvin, is asking “do you wear either Vans or Vejas and like either a slightly cropped jean or a a trouser with a roll in the bottom” - if you’re answering yes here, then you’re onto a winner.


7. Pinq Pong

Chances are you haven’t come across Pinqpong yet, the Germany based bags and accessories brand have been around since 2014 and haven’t yet made it across the channel yet. Which is pretty mad as they’re a big deal in Europe!


Using only recycled polyester fabric in their bags, a member of the Fair Wear foundation for ethical manufacture and covered by Bluesign and PETA - they’re a conscious brand that make backpacks and bum-bags for those looking for there next urban adventure.


This is classic east london, works in advertising, has been known to ride a fixie territory. With roll-top and clamshell opening bags that are thoughtfully designed for anything modern life throws at them. Easily fitting your mac-book, charger, camera and change of clothes.


They all come in classic millennial colour ways that you can probably get to match your Chillies/S'well water bottle - phew!


8. Allbirds

Allbirds trainers need to be tried. Or at least tried on. Not in a ‘will they fit’ sort of trying on, but more of a “oh wow I really am actually being cuddled by sheep and dancing on clouds” trying on.


Allbirds are famed for their classic merino wool runner, a minimal fuss shoe that wants to be worn all day long and goes with pretty much anything casual. Less is more here and Allbirds pride themselves on restrained, contemporary design, in restrained, contemporary colour-ways.


Sustainability is covered through lots of merino wool, laces made from recycled bottles and a range of summer shoes with a more mesh like fabric are made from Tencel, a Eucalyptus plant fibre - so there’s no barking up the wrong tree when it comes to eco-friendly fibres. Pun fully intended.


More recently they’ve also introduced a water resistant wool runner, pleasingly called the ‘Mizzle’ and they do some rather nice socks made from wool and trees.



***BIG NEWS*** as of when i’m writing this blog, they’ve just launched a running shoe made from natural fibres too! Go check it out sports fans!


Oh and Allbirds are a B-Corp too, meaning they’re legally bound to no funny business.


9. Nimble

Nimble makes activewear for women and does it with a big smile on their face. Over the past year their range has stepped up a gear to offer their more supportive leggings and sports bras that will cover you from medium intensity workouts to 5k’s.


They sit just under the price points of more ‘sports lux’ brands and come in a range of muted colours and subtle patterns. All with just enough fun to make a 6am wake up call for pilates that much more bearable…


Sustainability creds comes from their recycled polyester/spandex compression fabric that is quick drying, opaque and provides 4 way stretch.


Added goodness from before you’ve even hit the gym comes from Nimble giving AU $1 to the women’s empowerment charity ‘I = Change'.


10. Janji

When we see an activewear brand with decent sustainable credentials that isn’t based around women’s yoga wear, our ears prick up.


Janji is a running specific sportswear brand for men and women, releasing limited edition drops of singlets, shorts, running tees and running jackets that are inspired by the global cities and countries they run in. Working with local artists to crate unexpected designs that bring modern day running gear firmly into the design-led world of 2020.




This is serious running gear too, for those of you partial to a Parkrun of a 10k, you’ll see well thought through design features and impeccable quality that is well up there with anything Nike or Adidas could make.


There’s a mix of sustainable and less-sustainable fabrics in use. We recommend checking out anything made with their recycled ‘AFO’ technical fabric, or their ‘Runpaca’ range that’s cotton & Alpaca!


11. Mayamiko

There’s no getting away from the fact that Mayamiko are good fun. Stylish fun. But good fun. This is sustainable style that will have you drowning in compliments with plenty of whispers in your ear of “where did you get that?”.


Ethically sourced and made in Malawi, Mayamiko reflects its vibrant roots in bold patterned prints in fun playsuits, jumpsuits and dresses. It’s all subtly tailored too with a bit of structure coming from woven cotton fabrics.
 

Mayamiko purchases all their fabrics from local cooperatives of women traders. Alongside training and working directly with artisans across Malawi, Sri Lanka and Burma. The bulk of styles coming from their zero-waste workshop in Malawi, where every off-cut is used up.



Local sourcing of fabrics does mean that most styles only have 15-20 pieces available, so it’s always worth a browse of Mayamiko’s new-arrivals.


12. Known Supply

Known Supply are pretty much as transparent as it gets. It’s a real “window” into how clothing should be made. And who would of thought we’d be able to get a window based transparency pun into this guide… 


They made organic cotton jersey styles, from t-shirts to sweats for men, from jumpsuits to tees for women. It’s classic easy going, wear it pretty much any day and any where clothing. Very lockdown chic.


Known Supply put names and faces to everyone who makes their clothes, and asks if you want to tell those makers "thanks!". Whoever sews your garment will even sign their name on the label, and then you can type in that name onto the website and get to know that person a little better!


In a way, it’s pretty mad to think we live in a world where actually knowing who made your clothes is such a bold idea. But we're mighty pleased it's happening.


13. Ekn

So Ekn just squeezed on to this list, if we’re being honest they are a tad pricey. But then we looked at how much you might pay for a premium pair of trainers outside of the more sustainable world, and Ekn then suddenly looked fairly reasonable!


Ekn make bang on trend footwear in Portugal, using materials such as vegetable tanned leathers, organic cotton and recycled neoprene. Taking inspiration from classic styles such as Nike Air Force 1, Desert boots and chunky soled athleisure lux sneakers.


It’s great to see a sustainable footwear brand not trying to copy Veja and just go their own route. The quality of all Ekn’s styles is pretty insane and it’s this match of style, quality and durability which makes them a worthy investment.


14. A-dam

A-dam make men’s underwear that’ll make you smile when you pull it them on - and if you’re lucky enough, will likely get a smile from anyone taking them off too!


With well structured organic cotton boxer shorts that have a good shaped pouch for keeping the crown jewels in good nick. Alongside soft organic cotton socks blended with recycled nylon Econyl and elastane.


All of these come in a cheery array of fun loving summer colours and prints including lollipops, space invaders, Maccy D fries and Rocky Balboa. There are also a couple of prints that feature crabs but we're not entirely sure if that’s quite what you want to be advertising on your boxer shorts!


Anyway, A-dam are a refreshing ray of sustainable sunshine for your underwear drawer and well worth taking a look at.


15. Jungmaven

On the one hand, we shouldn’t like Jungmaven, they make the archetypal historic ‘sustainable clothing’ made from hemp fabric and tie-dye products that pigeon holed sustainable clothing as only for people leading alternative lifestyles for much of the late 20th century and early 21st century.


But my oh my has the world of sustainable clothing changed over the past 2 years! Everyone’s cottoned on (or should that be hemped on?) to the amazing properties of hemp.


Hemp just love to grow, pretty much anywhere and without any need for outside assistance, let alone chemicals. It also happens to be tough as nails, and when combined with some organic cotton makes a soft fabric that’ll last for years on end.


So it’s a bit of superstar at the moment which probably goes to tell why over the past 12 months Jungmaven have:

a) Been seen here, there and everywhere

b) Put their prices up!


Covering men’s and women’s, Jungmaven’s clothing is an array of slightly rugged, honestly casual essentials. Dreamy peach striped sweatshirts, striped tube socks, twill chore/worker jackets and tees with ‘California Dreamin’ printed on the front with some palm trees. They even do laid back dungarees.


16. Reformation

We love Reformation because they get it. They understand that not everyone is going to want to buy everything in organic cotton jersey, or have everything looking like it’s out of an eco-capsule collection that every eco-blogger is going to be an micro-influencer for.


Instead Reformation make clothes for people who unashamedly want to stay super stylish and are into fashion. Which, if we’re being honest, is a whole lot of people. And Reformation is a great step into understanding sustainable clothing if you’re coming from fast fashion.


It’s the crossover brand the world needs.


There’s nothing aesthetically ‘slow fashion’ about Reformation’s style. But their use of quality manufacturing and fabrics means that although their styles may be in one season and out the next - by the time the trend inevitably comes around again in a couple of years, Reformation’s styles will be in perfect condition to make a reappearance on the ‘gram.


It does mean that it definitely doesn’t come anywhere near to competing with fast fashion prices, but maybe in it's own way, that's a good thing.



This is fast-fashion’s way cooler younger sister that is ready to turn heads and make a statement. We’re glad it arrived.


17. ISTO

The best way to describe ISTO is to think of what a brand would look like, if it was basically Everlane, but Portuguese, a little more affordable and with a slightly smaller range.Basically, it’s pretty nice.


Men’s styles are soft organic cotton t-shirts, sweatshirts, oxford shirts and chore jackets. In a range of muted colour ways you’d expect to fill the streets of Lisbon. All cut in a slim but not too slim fit and finished to a premium standard.




For women it’s a slightly smaller, but growing range of organic cotton crew neck t-shirts and a really well cut linen shirt that could fit perfectly into a summer work wardrobe.


Prices fall into the £30 for a t-shirt, £65 for a shirt, £150 for a jacket kind of region. So premium, but excellent quality. Definite investment pieces if you’ve got a bit more money to be able to spend.



18. Girlfriend Collective

We really, really like Girlfriend Collective. They’ve built an ethically made activewear range for women in a recycled polyester fabric, and they’ve made it super inclusive. From XXS - 6XL and 3 leg lengths, Girlfriend Collective are all about making sure everyone has the opportunity and confidence to get active. 


You won’t find any wacky prints here, just solid beautiful pantone colours in a range of leggings, sports bras, unitards, shorts, crop tops and windbreaker jackets. Covering everything from low to high impact workouts, while offering medium support.


Also they are absolutely fab in having the most diverse range of models and don’t come across as super try hard about it all.


Girlfriend Collective make us happy and we think they’ll do the same for you.


19. Adidas Parley

Adidas Parley is one of those concepts that when you start digging, becomes even more impressive.The premise of Adidas Parley is to take ocean plastic out of the sea, recycle it and turn it into high performance sportswear. These days, that isn’t that such a mad concept.


But this Adidas. The scale of the impact they have is crazy. The first Adidas Parley Ultraboost shoes they released in 2017 sold 1 million pairs. And from then on, it’s only grown.


There’s also another huge benefit. The sportswear is reasonably priced, and seriously good performance.Adidas have built up a pretty huge range of men’s and women’s recycled sportswear to cover you for swimming, tennis, hiking, running, football…and pretty much every other sport in between.


When companies like Adidas start to move to recycled materials and circular design thinking, then real change is afoot.


They also designed a prototype trainer called the ‘Futurecraft Loop sneaker’ which is made from one single type of plastic so has the potential to enter into a circular cycle, where at the end of it’s life the plastic can be turned into a new shoe again…


20. Lucy & Yak

If you’re reading this, are female, are under the age of 30 and from the UK, then Lucy & Yak need no introduction. If that isn’t you, then Lucy & Yak can be pretty neatly summed up in 5 words - “Must Have Organic Cotton Dungarees”.


With a cult like appearance on any left leaning liberal university campus, Lucy & Yak are to be quite frank, an absolute delight.


You essentially get to dress up like you’re a 5 year old child again, but this time it’s super on trend and wonderfully practical for everyday life. Lucy & Yak offer a massive array of colour ways and lighter/heavier weight styles - all with their signature self-tie straps.


21. grünBAG

If you’re familiar with Freitag bags, then you’ll be on board with grünBAG.grünBAG are a Danish brand that take old tarpaulins from lorry covers, bouncy castles and big top festival tents and turn them into tough as nails bags that looks incredible on your insta feed - oh and work like a dream on your back.



Made from 90% upcycled, recycled or sustainable materials, these colourful rucksacks, shoulder bags, sports bags and cases give materials that could last a lifetime, a new lifetime of use.grünBAGs are sewn at grünBAG HQ in Denmark alongside specialists in Poland - they’re happy to swap out any leather components for vegan alternatives too.


A good starting point in their range is the classic backpack. With a pocket for your MacBook, loads of space for life’s essentials and a secure zipped pocket, whilst somehow still looking slim and sleek.

The branding is pretty in your face but they somehow pull it off perfectly - and it means that others "in the know" will instantly recognise your fine sustainable choice of luggage and probs give you a friendly smile.


22. Patagonia

Do they even need an introduction? Patagonia. Pioneers, innovators, leaders. The outdoors brand that believes in a better, more sustainable, more peaceful and more liberal world where humans and nature live in harmony.


Or at least where humans try to limit f***ing up the world any more than we have already and preferably make some vague attempt at making some of it better.



1% of their sales help hundreds of grassroots organisations all over the world to protect nature, culture and heritage - which is epic. Their founder even co-founded the 1% for the planet programme that sees thousands of great companies do the same.


Patagonia builds the best product possible, products that can be loved, repaired and loved some more, for years to come. They cause no unnecessary harm, they realise their business is part of the problem but they seek to do less harm and more good.


Expect top of the range outdoorsy styles in relaxed and performance fits for men and women. You can climb the worlds greatest mountains in this gear but for the more urban style conscious check out their range of insulated jackets and medium weight organic long sleeve tees.


So go out and rep that logo like you’ve never repped a logo before. The world needs to see it, the world needs to see you in it.


Oh and they were the first brand to actively tell you: Don’t buy this jacket. 


An inspiration to us all, cheers Patagonia for existing.


23. Tide & Seek

First up. Cracking name. Any swimwear brand willing to leverage a pun is a winner in our books.


Thankfully their women’s swimwear lives up to the esteemed level of their punnery. Made from recycled polyester this is swimwear that’s the antithesis of the muted colours sustainable gang.


We’re talking a myriad of fun pastel neon vibes in one pieces and bikini sets. It’s uplifting, it’s energy giving and it’s got all the hallmarks of exactly what you’ll be wanting to wear as soon as the lockdown has lifted (maybe if you're reading this it's now over - hooray! - hopefully the year is not 2023...).


Their products have names like ‘Sea Sparkle’, ‘Jungle Disco’ and ‘Popsicle’. It’s all just so refreshing to have a sustainable swimwear brand that’s going after a good time rather than trying to be every vegan-insta-blogger’s BFF.


They also make sure the large majority of their range has the secure support needed to be properly active and genuinely swim and surf in their swimwear.


24. Mollusk Surf Shop

With a dreamy California surfer vibe, a clothing range for men and women that’s full of earthy colours, relaxed cuts for lazy sunny days, and prints by some of America’s best up and coming artists, Mollusk Surf Shop is slowly becoming a serious player when it comes to laid back style.


Mollusk speaks to that little part of you that wants to sack off real life, grab a few mates, dig out your oil paints, find a surf board and live out the good life in a VW campervan.


To clothe you on such a beautiful adventure, Mollusk supply hemp and organic cotton tees and lightweight slubby sweatshirts. Add in a couple of variants on colour, print and stripe - then chuck on your favourite pair of well loved jeans - and you my friend, are ready to go.


25. Jollie's

Would you like a pair of reasonably priced socks that are quite jolly, made expertly in Portugal from organic cotton and for every pair of socks you buy another pair will be donated to a homeless shelter in the UK?


Would you also like the company you bought them from to have a sock recycling scheme, where you can get free socks by giving them your old socks?


Would you also like these socks to make your ankles look damn beaut?


Well then, you are asking an awful lot!


But thankfully Jollie’s socks exists and they do all this…and maybe even more…


26. Weekday

OK, lets point out the elephant in the room when it comes to Weekday - they’re part of H&M group. We’ll leave it up to you to decide what you make of that.


However, when it comes to reasonably priced, on trend clothing (again, we’ll leave it up to you to decide what you make of that too), that’s made out of organic cotton or recycled fibres, Weekday do pretty well!


We’re happy to admit that we own a couple of sturdy workwear tees from Weekday that are in great shape after 3 years of heavy use. We've also tried some of their boxers too, which are fairly terrible!


There’s a sort of 90’s workwear, steezy skater vibe that anyone either very cool, or under the age of 21 is currently still loving at the moment. Lots of oversized tees, light wash denim and a few bucket hats knocking about.


They’re great for heavy duty overshirts for guys and if you’re after women’s denim, then they’ve got a killer offering in some great fits and crops. 


27. Level Collective

Level Collective are purveyors of men’s wholesome outdoor/city lifestyle gear.


You know, the kind of range that’s green and burgundy organic cotton tees, waxed cotton 5 panel caps, roll top waxed cotton backpacks with leather trims and printed line drawing organic cotton sweatshirts that say things like “Head for the hills” or “Nomad”.


They even sell an axe hand forged in Somerest, UK and hiking boots that are handmade by a family business in Italy.


It’s solid quality gear that’s ethically sourced, sustainably sound and not overly expensive for the most part.If you’re living in the city but hear the call of the wild, then Level Collective are here for you.


28. Seeker X Retriever

Seeker X Retriever have a clarity of style. Visually very easy to understand. Alas less easy to understand when trying to describe it in words…


It feels like east and west aren’t so much colliding, but melding together. Then somehow overlay this with contemporary cuts and fits, that makes something abstract look infinitely wearable - so long as you’re somewhere hot and slightly humid.


Designed in Australia and made across South East Asia, Seeker x Retriever is not your average slow fashion brand. But it comes to slow fashion they tick all the boxes. Working with artisans in Northern Thailand to create hand-loomed natural fabrics that are naturally dyed, and collaborating with small Indian art collectives for their hand printed fabrics.



Think collarless shirting, cropped overalls, bold hand printed co-ords, loose deconstructed blazers and jinbei-style coats.Check them out using the link below.


29. Knowledge Cotton Apparel

Knowledge Cotton Apparel are a solid menswear brand. Are their clothes leading the field when it comes to style? No. Are their colours popping off the page? No.


Are their sustainability credentials on-point as you’d expect from any self respecting Danish ethical/sustainable brand? Yes. Are their styles up to date and well made? Yes.


That sort of sums it up. If you’re a guy who just wants some decent clothes that are durable, use more sustainable fabrics like organic cotton and recycled polyester, and will fit in easily with the clothes you already have in your wardrobe, then Knowledge Cotton Apparel are a great choice.


From casual chinos, to button down flannel shirts, to casual jackets, Knowledge Cotton Apparel have a really wide range that leans ever so slightly to a semi-outdoorsy vibe.


30. Monki

You know that elephant in the room we talked about when it came to Weekday? Well it’s back again for Monki. Monki are another H&M group brand, so we’ll let you take your own stance on what you make of purchasing anything from them.


But again, like Weekday, Monki are do create bang on trend, really reasonably priced womenswear from an array of organic cotton and recycled materials.From cropped boxy jackets, to sleeveless dresses, to dungarees, to high waist cotton twill shorts to singlets…all in an array of delightful pastel and soft neon hues.


Monki do fun Scandi design and they do fun Scandi design really really well. They have a shop on Carnaby Street in London too, and it’s full of mirrored walls and popping pinks - and well worth a visit when all this lockdown madness is a memory of the past.


31. Komodo

Komodo have been making ethical, sustainable clothing for guys and girls since 1988. So they know what’s what and do it real good. In the past 2 years Komodo have really upped their style game too.


For guys it hits the “East London creative in his late twenties working at a marketing agency” vibe - so think slightly oversized sweatshirt, tapered cropped chinos worn with a pair of vans. Some pretty epic camp collar shirt/shorts co-ords for guys too.


For women think breezy summer culottes, printed jumpsuits and cropped straight leg striped denim. The women’s range looks like it’s currently heading in the direction of laid back, utility inspired city style, all cut to fit just right. The range of women’s trousers is really good.


Sustainability credentials are ticked off with a full house of our your favourite fabrics like organic cotton, Tencel, linen and hemp.


32. Thought

Thought are another staple of the sustainable clothing scene, having been making thoughtful styles since 1995.With more of a focus on grown-up womenswear, they make a range of floaty all over print dresses, hemp cropped leg jumpsuits and wide leg culottes. Alongside soft organic cotton tees, light knits and recycled wool jackets.


It’s the kind of style that has good work/life wardrobe crossover potential, and is very much seasonal but not in ‘bang on trend’ sort of way. More of a ‘you’ll wear this every summer for years’ sort of way.


The smaller range of menswear ticks off plain and striped styles of organic cotton t-shirt, shirts, shorts and deconstructed blazers. It’s relatively smart and great if you’re into classic, understated menswear style with a touch of soft tailoring to it.


33. Arket

Ah Arket, like it’s friends Monki and Weekday, Arket is part of the monolith clothing machine that is H&M group. So as ever, we’ll leave it up to you to make your own decision whether or not to part with your money to them. 


However, much like Monki and Weekday, Arket offers a range of really reasonably priced style that’s bang on trend, with a good selection made out of our favourite sustainable fibres such as organic cotton, Econyl and recycled polyester.


The style for men and women is modern Scandi essentials. Which basically translates to everything fitting impeccably well. Where anything oversized is just the right amount of large without looking baggy, anything cropped shows the perfect amount of ankle… you get the idea.


For women think oversized organic cotton shirt dresses, cropped workwear jackets, wide cropped jeans and strapped back Econyl swimsuits.


For men it’s heavyweight organic cotton t-shirts, crisp oxford shirts, twill overshirts and slim chinos.


34. Veja

Ok, we’re just gunna go ahead and say. We’re still in love with Veja.


You know the drill. Style and substance is the name of the game. My own Veja’s are still going strong after 48 months of daily abuse on the streets of London, Brighton, Sheffield and Cornwall. And that includes a fair few nights out that would otherwise be death to a different pair of off-white sneaks.


Their organic cotton is bought directly from farmers using fair trade principles and they were working with natural rubber and natural dyes before it was cool.


Even their distribution network is top drawer, Veja’s logistics being handled by a non-profit that helps vulnerable individuals to find a job and regain social stability.


All sustainable clothing brands have a lot to thank Veja for. Without doubt the linchpin to bringing sustainable fashion into the mainstream.


35. Rotholz

If you’re into a minimalist aesthetic, with a touch of streetwear thrown in, and have a penchant for fair labour and sustainable fabrics, then may we introduce Rotholz. This is a modern slow-fashion take on more workwear inspired pieces all a little oversized, and definitely in a good way.
 


Women and Men are catered for in fairly equal measure and most of the styles have a unisex vibe. Expect to discover oversized organic cotton hoodies, camp collar shirts and our personal favourite, an unstructured corduroy jacket in all black. 


Sustainability comes from organic cotton, lots of wool, recycled polyester and Tencel. It's all above-board here with their suppliers having Fair Wear Foundation and GOTS certifications.

They've just released a bigger range for SS20 and it's all so damn nice! Go check...


36. Colorful Standard

Colourful Standard are a Portuguese factory brand, meaning that they make super high quality soft as hell t-shirts, sweatshirts and hoodies and sell them to you direct. Cutting out loads of extra air miles and cutting out loads of extra middle man money.


So basically you get better unisex basics for less $$$. Now that’s out kind of equation.


Colourful standard make everything using 100% organic cotton and do so in insane amount of solid colours. So
if you’re looking for a high quality, plain organic cotton t-shirt and want to spend £27, then click the link below and thank us later.


37. WAWWA

WAWWA are pretty great, and have really pushed on in the last couple of years. They’re a UK utility inspired brand who sit in a sort of sustainable Carharrt sort of zone.


They do unisex styles with a workwear feel, mainly using heavier weight fabrics and recycled trims. They’ve done a superb rugby shirt with zip pocket, and a jacket called the ‘Jenson’ that sits perfectly as a 2020 windbreaker style.


Add onto that a range of sturdy loopback organic cotton sweatshirts and organic cotton socks made in the UK - and you’ve got yourself a pretty rad range right?!


38. Waterhaul

Waterhaul are a Cornish social enterprise that work in partnership with Iberian fishermen to collect discarded fishing gear and recycle them into hard wearing and durable premium plastic products.


So far this has included sunglasses, litter pickers and soon is to include diving fins. An eclectic mix!


We’re most interested in their sunglasses and eyewear. Coming in 3 types of classic frame shapes, Waterhaul’s recycled fishing gear frames come in matt black with UV400 mineral glass polarised lenses.


The lenses are often an afterthought for sustainable sunglasses brands, but Waterhaul have gone for premium Italian glass lenses that offer a view for your eyes that is almost twice as crisp as plastic alternatives. Better still as they’re glass, they’re easily recyclable at their end of life.


39. North Face Renewed / Patagonia Worn Wear

Both of these websites are essentially the equivalent of buying a refurbished iPhone, but for outdoor gear.


Essentially North Face and Patagonia both use this bigger take-back service that takes collects in a central place your used jackets, sweatshirts, fleeces… gives them some good old TLC to make them pretty much as good as new - then they’re uploaded to a branded marketplace.


Imagine that for a second as either North Face or Patagonia. One day you sell something new to someone. They love it! They wear it for years and years, then they fancy a change. So they give it back to you in exchange for maybe a voucher. Then, they take that older jacket - and sell it all over again!I mean if that’s the future of business then sign us up!


So it’s great for everyone really. And a really handy place to pick up a) serious outdoor kit for lots of money off and b) pick up some retro garms without some 15 year old kid putting a £200 mark up on it on Depop.


40. Patapaca

Have you ever thought about how much you’d spend on a piece of clothing vs how much you use it?


Let’s take socks, if you’re fond of a dash of ankle colour and a chunky knit, chances are you have a favourite sock that gets worn once a week and has been worn for so many years you can’t actually remember when you got them. So maybe you’d be inclined to spend a little more on your feet friends?


Ok, so now we’ve gently prepared you, we’ll just go out and say it. Patapaca make socks that cost £30. A pair.We know, that’s a lot for a pair of socks but you’ve probably spent that much on a t-shirt that sits at the back of your wardrobe and Patapaca socks are a thing of beauty. Made from 50% Alpaca wool in Peru, they are potentially the cosiest pair of socks that will ever grace your sock drawer.


With a chunky knit and alpaca wool, they’re also the perfect sock for darning if repairs are needed. So there’s a fairly good chance that once Patapaca enter your socks drawer, they may never leave and that’s a pretty good investment!


41. Luva Huva

Luva Huva make beautiful, handcrafted lingerie from fabrics such as organic cotton, Tencel and bamboo, all from their studio base in Brighton, UK.Working with small ranges and a close-knit passionate team, all styles have the option of custom sizing for the perfect fit.


The Luva Huva range covers lace and Chantilly bralettes, sheer briefs, premium organic cotton lingerie jersey sets, and organic cotton nightwear.



If you’re looking for a pretty, feminine style that provides a more sustainable and environmentally friendly alternative to an often wasteful fashion industry, then look no further than Luva Huva.


42. Greater Goods

In a way, Greater Goods shouldn’t have made it into this list. At £149 for a side bag, they’re a pretty spenny brand that we can’t really afford. 


HOWEVER…They scrape on in because they’re the best example of upcycling we’ve seen in a really long time.Greater Goods take old Gore-Tex jackets, cut them up, and turn them into a range of bags.


They’ve tapped into the utility/outdoors streetwear trend and made a range of totally unique products that have a cool value that’s through the roof. There's serious cred about them - and sustainability needs some creatively inspiring brands before it slowly turns into a blurry sea of ‘women’s capsule wardrobe’ brands.


All Greater Goods products are made in London and their blog is well worth a read if you’re into a modern take on upcycling in clothing.


43. Flamingos Life

To put it simply, Flamingos Life are a Spanish Veja. Working out of their Spanish factory, they make great looking casual vegan sneakers out of marvellous materials such as hemp, natural rubber, corn waste, hemp and recycled plastic.


With muted shades of ecru offset with subdued red, navy and green branding, Flamingos Life shoes are going to go with nearly everything in your wardrobe and have a summery feel that makes you feel like you’re treading the streets of Barcelona with every step.


In all seriousness though, it’s Veja with an ‘F’ on it rather than a ‘V’. So basically just choose your favourite consonant and that’s your choice made here!


44. Aniàn

Aniàn hits the spot if you’re after some semi-rugged gear that actually would look pretty sharp both on an afternoon hike and the evening pub session that the hike so thoroughly deserves.


With a small range of men’s and women’s heavyweight woollen over-shirts, slightly lighter hemp and organic cotton button down shirts, some merino fisherman sweats and and a few organic cotton jersey products. 


It’s a classic entry level hipster vibe, going perfectly with a 5 panel cap, some well worn in selvedge jeans and a pair of red wing shoes. This all starts to make sense when you learn Aniàn is from Vancouver in Canada. Where I think hipster’s are just called ‘outdoorsy folk’ and probably legit go into the outdoors.


Anyway, we really like Aniàn because they use lots of recycled wool in their shirts, their kit is seriously well made, gets rave reviews and will last you years and years.


45. Know The Origin

Know The Origin are best known for as the ethical home for sustainable brands covering Womenswear, Menswear and Homewares. They stock a cracking soap brand PoaPoa which you should definitely check out too! 


Know The Origin also have an own-label range of basics too, with Fair-Trade and organic cotton tees (very nice mens striped tee), zipped hoodies and camis alongside high necked Modal dresses, all very reasonably priced.


Know The Origin are leaders in total transparency, so when you buy one of their pieces they’ll be able to tell you, and have relationships with everyone along the entire supply chain. From the family farming the cotton plants to the final factory. All safe in the knowledge that it has been fairly traded and made to the highest ethical standards.


This is easy going, wearable essentials for the uncompromising conscious consumer.


You should check out a recent blog their founder did on the difference between being transparent and being ethical - it’s well worth a read especially for all the noise brands like H&M are putting into being ‘the most transparent brand in the world’.


46. Organic Basics

Welcome to a blueprint for how to create a Scandi minimalist sustainable basic clothing brand. We don’t think the meeting for their name took very long.With a mission to create ‘sustainable and better made basics’ they’ve created a range of organic cotton, Tencel and recycled nylon, all in black and white or a range of perfectly Copenhagen warm yet cool muted colours.


Their branding is beautiful, their models are beautiful, even their basics somehow look beautiful in the way that they’re so damn basic. Which is really the epitome of why everything Scandi is so damn cool.


You’ll find some organic cotton styles leaning into activewear too, with organic cotton blended with antibacterial silver yarn and just the right amount of elastane to keep everything in place without any clammy snugness. They also make sure their Turkish and European fabric suppliers and factories are audited, fair paying and transparent.


Definitely at the premium end of your everyday basics, but some more reasonably priced t-shirt and underwear bundles. Expect to find slim cut tees and cute briefs that your bum and the planet will look great in.


Oh and they’ve also started up the Organic Basics Fund which supports grassroots activists and organisations that address the environmental crisis. So they're definitely one of the good ones.


47. Monkee Genes

Since 2006 Monkee Genes have been one of the pioneers of more sustainable denim. Bringing affordably priced organic cotton denim to a collections of women’s and men’s skinny and slim fits, with recent additions of wide leg skate fits and straight leg crops for women.




A firm believer in Fashion Revolution and having a direct relationship, oversight and responsibility for who and how their products are being made, Monkee Genes ensure the safety and welfare of their workers alongside making sure every maker is paid a living wage. Bonus ‘feel good about your purchase’ points come from their PETA certification.


The Monkee Genes style is very laid back skater with a pair of well worn vans or converse. Think front row of the latest indie gig kinda vibe. It’s quite a refreshing difference to the ‘conscious, clean and green’ vibe of pretty much every other eco-denim brand.


48. Beacon & Armour

Beacon & Armour are bringing British knitwear to an audience that isn’t your grandparents. Specifically bringing back the Guernsey knit and the Submariner knit for the 21st Century.


Being made from British wool and knitted in Britain, it means if you’re a British customer of Beacon & Armour you can probably stick your head out of the window and hear the nicely shorn sheep bleating, and the sound of knitting tapping away on the wind.


But in all seriousness, less air miles and more frolicking lambs is the way it should be.Using Wool also gives Beacon & Armour a great sustainable advantage too. At the end of life it will happily decompose back in to the ground, ready to become the soil that grows the grass, that feeds the sheep, that grow the wool, that makes another jumper.


Also once you’ve YouTubed some ‘darning skills’, a high quality piece of knitwear can very easily last a lifetime.


49. Flax London

Ok, here goes. Linen. For men. That isn't for the French Riviera.

No, don't scroll on. Wait a moment. Because the chaps at Flax have created a menswear range that repositions linen as a central fabric for your everyday urban wardrobe.

Linen is one of these sustainable wonder fibres, it grows in cooler climates (loads in the UK, Ireland, France and Belgium) and needs no pesticides or extra irrigation. It just loves to grow in decent soil!

Anyway, Flax London have taken this wonder fibre and turned it into some pretty great worker jackets, patch pocket shorts and smock shirts.


50. pact

pact have the fab tagline of “no gross stuff”. They make straight up organic cotton essentials that are easy on the planet and easy on your bank account.


It’s pretty unfussy styles, for women there’s a range of relaxed organic bras, bralettes, hipsters and briefs, with a few subtle frills here and there. Alongside some slouchy sweatshirts and hoodies for even more soft cotton comfort.


For guys, it’s all about the simple 2-pack undershirts for $25 and 3 for $30 boxers. As well as some heather marl sweatpants and long sleeve slub tees.


Now that’s the good new, but the bad news is it’s only those of you from USA or Canada that can buy from them!Fingers crossed for more international shipping soon…


Congratulations, you made it!

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Click the link below and use the checkout code: MADE-IT

Have a great day!